EDU 800 ANNOTATED BIB WEEK 8#1

SUMMARY

Forest and Kimmel (2016) undertakes a qualitative study in critical literacy performances of learners in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course. The research methodology is content analysis. The aim of the study is twofold, that is, (1) to evaluate a graduate level children’s critical literature course from the lens of critical thinking and perspective, and (2) to implant critical literature and perspective in a children’s literature courses and examine the behavioral and learning effects of literature in children’s books in an online, asynchronous environment. The research question is “In what ways do graduate students in an online, asynchronous children’s literature course engage in critical literacy during discussion of children’s books?” (p. 284). The key words in the study are critical literacy, online teaching, book discussion, and children’s literature.

Forest and Kimmel (2016) argue that “library educators must take responsibility for incorporating critical literacy practices in the preparation and continuing education of school and public librarians” (p. 283). The researchers describe critical literacy as social interaction, social collaboration and accessibility in an online, asynchronous environment. The researchers postulate that UDL offers students and learners multitudinous options in acquisition knowledge and knowledge transfer in an online, asynchronous environment. In the Forest and Kimmel (2016) study, students were graded through their participation in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course. The grading formation of the course kept the students engaged, motivated during the examination and evaluation of study.

EVALUATION

Forest and Kimmel (2016) presented a useful study through the lens of critical literacy and perspective in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course. In analyzing and evaluating the methods in the study, the researchers did a phenomenal job in the research design. The researchers’ added empirical data to the body of scholarly knowledge using the lens of critical literature and perspective in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course. That is, the researcher’s selected 40 graduate level students enrolled in a Children’s Literature course during the summer of 2014. In groups of 4 to 5 graduate students, the students analyzed the content of four children’s books and then discussed the books in an online, asynchronous chat room. Each student was given alternating roles to discuss its content knowledge and knowledge acquisition of children’s books throughout the semester in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course. Each student was graded on its knowledge transfer and information sharing about the content of each book. The research questions were predesigned by a similar study that had learning effects in critical literacy and perspective. In the data analysis, the researchers’ analyzed 36 transcripts from the chat room. After analyzing the transcripts, the researchers coded the data into five phases of content analysis. In the outcomes, students highlighted key variables, such as: gender, social class, race, stereotypes, politics and justice. The study was reliable and transferable to the population of students who are studying library science in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course. The researchers’ proved that critical literacy and perspective could foster deep thinking and social interactions in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course.

REFLEXTION

Forest and Kimmel (2016) work on critical literacy and perspective is scholarly and well written for the library sciences in an online, asynchronous graduate level children’s literature course. In fact, critical literacy, moreover, may be applied to the other sciences in an online, asynchronous undergraduate, graduate and post graduate level environment. Perhaps critical literacy could be applied to elementary and secondary education in an online, asynchronous graduate level course using the same formation. What is more, the constant collaboration, communication and interaction with respect to critical literature and perspective is a model platform for online, asynchronous learning environments.

I find the Forest and Kimmel (2016) study very relevant to future research because of the interaction and role playing among the participants in an online, asynchronous graduate level course. For instance, critical literature and perspective could be applied to curriculars in educational technology or leadership in an online, asynchronous course. For example, the instructor could assign peer reviewed and scholarly articles to students in an online, asynchronous graduate level course. The students could play different roles and the instructor could examine the learning effects in an online, asynchronous graduate level course.

 

Forest, D. d., & Kimmel, S. s. (2016). Critical Literacy Performances in Online Literature Discussions. Journal Of Education For Library & Information Science, 57(4), 283-294.

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